Jesse Fox

I'm a photographer, video & performance artist and this blog is for sharing my continuous new work. If you want to repost any of the artwork i put up here, please remember to give credit! thanks :)

you can see my website here: www.jessefox.net

& "like" me here: www.facebook.com/jessefoxart

Second photo in my series of illustrating song lyrics that I like & can relate to (first one is here).  This one is based off of a song by one of my favorite bands, Cage the Elephant. The lyrics are “you can drive all night looking for answers in the pouring rain. You wanna find peace of mind looking for the answer” from the song Cigarette Daydreams.
Lots of times I have help on shoots, but when I do self portraits I try to do it all myself. That wasn’t possible for this one, so I enlisted the help of my best friend (and amazing artist & musician) Jen Warren and her wonderful girlfriend, Cortnie (who has an important blog worth checking out— thatcortniegirl.com). Here’s a video of that + my lighting set-up if you’re interested:  https://vimeo.com/100917304Oh & just as in the previous one where I accidentally put earache drops in my eyes instead of eyedrops and almost went blind, there was of course a mishap in this shoot. This time I accidentally shut my head in the door as I was rushing into the car. Old car doors are very heavy.Enjoy!

Second photo in my series of illustrating song lyrics that I like & can relate to (first one is here).  This one is based off of a song by one of my favorite bands, Cage the Elephant. The lyrics are “you can drive all night looking for answers in the pouring rain. You wanna find peace of mind looking for the answer” from the song Cigarette Daydreams.

Lots of times I have help on shoots, but when I do self portraits I try to do it all myself. That wasn’t possible for this one, so I enlisted the help of my best friend (and amazing artist & musician) Jen Warren and her wonderful girlfriend, Cortnie (who has an important blog worth checking out— thatcortniegirl.com). Here’s a video of that + my lighting set-up if you’re interested:  https://vimeo.com/100917304

Oh & just as in the previous one where I accidentally put earache drops in my eyes instead of eyedrops and almost went blind, there was of course a mishap in this shoot. This time I accidentally shut my head in the door as I was rushing into the car. Old car doors are very heavy.

Enjoy!

I followed Kevin Devine & The Goddamn Band around for a couple days when they were around my area last week(end). Here are a few photos from the shows I attended.  
Concert photography is always fun because of how much I love music, but I’d never consider myself a “music photographer.”  I like when people are blurred and tend to be more interested in the lighting + facial expressions + movements of the band members rather than getting a nice, crisp photo.  In my own work I stage the lighting and models so much, it’s kind of fun to go into a concert and be excited about the idea that I have absolutely no idea if I’m going to come out with anything worthwhile or not. Anyways, enjoy & be sure to watch/listen to them if you get a chance.

I’m doing a pretty big show on August 8 at Obscura in Cincinnati. You should be there! The work was curated by Laura Miller Gleason and will be installed in the Jim Thompson Room, Underground at Obscura.https://www.facebook.com/events/255795377948621/

I’m doing a pretty big show on August 8 at Obscura in Cincinnati. You should be there! The work was curated by Laura Miller Gleason and will be installed in the Jim Thompson Room, Underground at Obscura.

https://www.facebook.com/events/255795377948621/

Die Antwoord at Bonnaroo.
Photos by Jesse Fox [www.jessefox.net]

The Orwells at Bonnaroo

People at Bonnaroo.

Image from a recent photoshoot I did with comedian Hannibal Buress.

Image from a recent photoshoot I did with comedian Hannibal Buress.

I saw The Kills at Cannery Ballroom in Nashville last night. It was one of the best experiences of my life so far. They are a huge inspiration to me in my own music “career” and put on an amazing show.  It was one of the first shows in ages I went to just for the love of watching the show & not photographing it— but I couldn’t help but take a few videos.  This was one of my favorites as this song has been pretty relevant to my life over the past year.  Enjoy & go see them if you ever get the opportunity. They’re incredible.

I remember the first time I walked into the Contemporary Arts Center in college. I had to write a review of an art show and figured the art there would be more interesting because of the whole “contemporary” thing.  I don’t remember which exhibit was up at the time, but I do remember liking it.  When Tara Donovan showed her work there in 2009, my life as an artist changed and the same happened again later that year when Marilyn Minter's work came to the CAC.  I aspired to be just like these women, showing large scale works inside a cool museum and while I'm still working toward that goal, I had a pretty amazing experience at the CAC last week. 

The CAC turned 75 recently and for their anniversary party I was asked to create an experience & photobooth that was engaging, sexy and artistic.  I worked with a friend from my theatre days, Jason Ervin, who is an amazing make-up artist now.  We had a few technical issues that set us a bit behind and by the time we opened the doors for event-goers to come participate, there was a huge crowd overflowing the space. It was terrifying in the best way to have that mix of pressure to make these photos amazing and pride that so many people were excited about it.

It is easy as you climb the ladder of success to start taking cool opportunities for granted because they start becoming normal.  This is a pretty amazing problem, but something that I try to think about a lot because I always want to be excited about the things I do with photography, as well as be very grateful.  

I still don’t have any of my artwork in the Contemporary Arts Center (unless you count the CityBeat copies laying around with a photo I did of them) and maybe I never will. But, if you had come to me 5 years ago and said they would make a Facebook post saying “CAC Loves Jesse Fox” I would have been shocked & thrilled. So I’m going to brush away the thoughts of “oh, it’s just because they know me…” and take that compliment in all its glory and be proud.

Anonymous asked: whenever a foxy song comes on, or happen upon the album cover, i jump up and down screaming because i follow the photographer on tumblr! you're the greatest inspiration i've ever met and hands down, one of the coolest. i could rant and rave about you but that could get a little awkwad hahah keep up the amazing work!!

Thank you!! It’s exciting to be recognized for such a wonderful album! I really appreciate your enthusiastic kind words! <3

cmplxx asked: Your photography is amazing! I'm moving to Cincinnati this weekend so its cool to see that there are actually awesome people there. I'm an aspiring film photographer, hopefully I'll be as good as you some day.

Thank you!! I would love to connect once you get settled here! There are a lot of wonderful creatives here, I’m sure you will love it!

brentbillock asked: PLEASE come to our show tomorrow night at Mayday Northside and bring your camera. It's our debut, and we're ready to rock the socks off this Cincinnati music scene. Won't it be awesome when CityBeat wants some shots of us and you already have them? Sincerely, Brent of Evening Redness

Hey Brent! I haven’t looked at my messages in awhile and since there’s no date listed on here, I’m sorry if I missed your show! I typically don’t do a lot of concert photography unless it’s a touring band… my schedule just doesn’t allow for it. However, since I am the staff photographer at CityBeat, when they do write about you we’ll get a photoshoot opportunity then. Good luck! See you at the CEAs :)

Vulnerability.It&#8217;s something I have never been good at feeling in my life. Up until fairly recently, I wanted to control everything down to the smallest of details because I didn&#8217;t like not knowing what was next for me.  I had trouble focusing on individual moments, because my brain was always focused on the &#8220;big picture&#8221; of my 1/3/5 year plans. 
Recently, I decided to be more vulnerable. I started to speak my mind even if it was a thought or opinion that could be uncomfortable.  I went to places that sounded fun even if I didn&#8217;t know who else would be there.  I asked cute people to hang out with me.  I wore clothes that I liked even though my thighs aren&#8217;t thin or toned.   And about a month ago, participated in photo project of the amazing Jedediah Johnson.  The Makeout Project explores the act of kissing and each portrait is different in the length of the kiss, the intimacy, etc. This quote I read from him in a Huffington Post article was particularly interesting to me:"I&#8217;m trying to sort of divorce kissing from an intimate act…. The idea that a kiss has to be romantic, I&#8217;m sort of trying to question that truth."  This really spoke to me &amp; made me even more intrigued than I already was about potentially participating in this project.As an art lover (and maybe a bit of a narcissist) I committed to being involved when his Makeout Tour came through Cincinnati. It wasn&#8217;t until that day that I really thought about it though. I asked a friend to participate and their response was &#8220;is he hot?&#8221;  I hadn&#8217;t thought about that. I had no idea who this guy was.  I had only seen his hand in these photos.  But how important was that in this project? Is my attraction to whoever I am participating in this with important or not?  A couple other friends who were going to participate mentioned that they&#8217;d need to be drunk to do it, which made me think maybe I needed to as well.  Spending a few moments thinking about this though, I realized this is another opportunity for me to be vulnerable and to have an experience in my life that might be weird, uncomfortable or awkward&#8212;- or it could be amazing, fun and empowering.  Using alcohol to make myself comfortable with a situation seemed counterintuitive to the entire point of this experience. I realized through thinking about all of this that The Makeout Project wasn&#8217;t just a one sided series just for Jedediah to shoot, print and hang in a gallery, it is also a big experience for those being photographed as well.  While standing in front of a camera always creates a bit of vulnerability for the model, The Makeout Project took that vulnerability to the next level&#8212; for all involved.  As a photographer myself, I loved how connected this series makes the model &amp; photographer in the creation of the photo.  I loved that Jedediah&#8217;s involvement is more than just pressing a button (as most of my shoots I am just sitting on my invisible director&#8217;s chair telling the model what to do while I can be positioned comfortably behind the camera).  I loved the sense of fear and excitement in the set-up and the act itself.  And, on a personal note, I loved being put into a position of feeling butterflies, fear, excitement and vulnerability that manifested itself into a fun afternoon with some of my closest friends and a beautiful portrait of myself.  

makeoutville:

The Smallest Slice of Revenge
from Jedediah Johnson's Makeout Project.
This is Jesse Fox. Looking at her photography makes me feel inadequate sometimes. I guess looking at her in general does too. 
Shot at Famous Neons Unplugged in Over-The-Rhine in Cincinnati

Vulnerability.
It’s something I have never been good at feeling in my life. Up until fairly recently, I wanted to control everything down to the smallest of details because I didn’t like not knowing what was next for me.  I had trouble focusing on individual moments, because my brain was always focused on the “big picture” of my 1/3/5 year plans. 

Recently, I decided to be more vulnerable. I started to speak my mind even if it was a thought or opinion that could be uncomfortable.  I went to places that sounded fun even if I didn’t know who else would be there.  I asked cute people to hang out with me.  I wore clothes that I liked even though my thighs aren’t thin or toned.   And about a month ago, participated in photo project of the amazing Jedediah Johnson.  The Makeout Project explores the act of kissing and each portrait is different in the length of the kiss, the intimacy, etc. This quote I read from him in a Huffington Post article was particularly interesting to me:
"I’m trying to sort of divorce kissing from an intimate act…. The idea that a kiss has to be romantic, I’m sort of trying to question that truth."  This really spoke to me & made me even more intrigued than I already was about potentially participating in this project.

As an art lover (and maybe a bit of a narcissist) I committed to being involved when his Makeout Tour came through Cincinnati. It wasn’t until that day that I really thought about it though. I asked a friend to participate and their response was “is he hot?”  I hadn’t thought about that. I had no idea who this guy was.  I had only seen his hand in these photos.  But how important was that in this project? Is my attraction to whoever I am participating in this with important or not?  A couple other friends who were going to participate mentioned that they’d need to be drunk to do it, which made me think maybe I needed to as well.  Spending a few moments thinking about this though, I realized this is another opportunity for me to be vulnerable and to have an experience in my life that might be weird, uncomfortable or awkward—- or it could be amazing, fun and empowering.  Using alcohol to make myself comfortable with a situation seemed counterintuitive to the entire point of this experience. 

I realized through thinking about all of this that The Makeout Project wasn’t just a one sided series just for Jedediah to shoot, print and hang in a gallery, it is also a big experience for those being photographed as well.  While standing in front of a camera always creates a bit of vulnerability for the model, The Makeout Project took that vulnerability to the next level— for all involved.  As a photographer myself, I loved how connected this series makes the model & photographer in the creation of the photo.  I loved that Jedediah’s involvement is more than just pressing a button (as most of my shoots I am just sitting on my invisible director’s chair telling the model what to do while I can be positioned comfortably behind the camera).  I loved the sense of fear and excitement in the set-up and the act itself.  And, on a personal note, I loved being put into a position of feeling butterflies, fear, excitement and vulnerability that manifested itself into a fun afternoon with some of my closest friends and a beautiful portrait of myself.  

makeoutville:

The Smallest Slice of Revenge

from Jedediah Johnson's Makeout Project.

This is Jesse Fox. Looking at her photography makes me feel inadequate sometimes. I guess looking at her in general does too. 

Shot at Famous Neons Unplugged in Over-The-Rhine in Cincinnati

Think | Lead | Influence: Jesse Fox

This is an interview I did with a really great clothing company, Misfit Genius Clothing.  We talk about music, being humble, starting out as a photographer and much, much more. Check it out— and then look at their clothing!