Jesse Fox

I'm a photographer, video & performance artist & this blog is for sharing my continuous new work. If you want to repost any of the artwork i put up here, please remember to give credit to the artist who created the work. thanks <3

you can see my website here: www.jessefox.net

& "like" me here: www.facebook.com/jessefoxart

Failure is something I&#8217;ve spent most of my life being afraid of. The expectations I have for myself are set pretty high, so &#8220;failing&#8221; is always a legitimate worry.  If I got a B on a test, I failed (unless it was math, then I was pretty damn proud of myself). If someone was mad at me, I failed. If I didn&#8217;t get 20+ likes on a picture I posted right away, I failed.  If my parents were disappointed in something I did, I failed.  The list goes on&#8230;
Earlier this year I experienced the biggest &#8220;failure&#8221; ever&#8230; I started the process of getting a divorce.  I didn&#8217;t tell anyone for a long time because I was so embarrassed. I was ashamed because since I got married when I was young, I knew everyone was going to say &#8220;I told you so&#8221;.  I visualized people judging me and making up scenarios as to what could have ended our relationship.  But most of all, I judged myself for not being good enough to keep the relationship going. What could I have done differently and, why am I giving up?  I never give up! Giving up is for failures.  It took me several months of continuously beating myself up over this before I finally realized I was totally wrong. I didn&#8217;t fail when I chose to end my relationship, I simply went down a different path in life (one that, so far, has been pretty incredible).
 This overwhelming fear of failure has always been especially present in my creative process.  If I took a photo I wasn&#8217;t proud of I would work it to death and eventually just slap a texture over it and pretend that was my original vision.  A lot of really important photographs in my career were created that way, actually.  However, learning to get over my irrational fear of failure in my personal life has really helped me to overcome it in my photographic work as well. 
 This photo was shot to go along with a new series I started (see this post) where I do self portraits based off song lyrics that I can relate to at the time or just love. Nothing about it was turning out the way I wanted it to in post processing&#8230; I tried so many different things and I couldn&#8217;t get it where I was happy.  I&#8217;m still not happy. This isn&#8217;t a photo I&#8217;d ever hang in a gallery or post with a sense of pride, but&#8212; did I fail in creating it? No. I learned what to do differently next time to get a better result.  Maybe it wasn&#8217;t what I originally hoped for, but the beauty of life &amp; digital photography is that it&#8217;s not hard to try again.  I gave up editing this trying to fit it to a vision in my head that was simply not working, but by giving up doesn&#8217;t make me a failure. Instead, it shows that I&#8217;m passionate enough about my vision to make it look exactly like what&#8217;s in my head for everyone else to see&#8212; and I&#8217;m proud of that. 

Failure is something I’ve spent most of my life being afraid of. The expectations I have for myself are set pretty high, so “failing” is always a legitimate worry.  If I got a B on a test, I failed (unless it was math, then I was pretty damn proud of myself). If someone was mad at me, I failed. If I didn’t get 20+ likes on a picture I posted right away, I failed.  If my parents were disappointed in something I did, I failed.  The list goes on…

Earlier this year I experienced the biggest “failure” ever… I started the process of getting a divorce.  I didn’t tell anyone for a long time because I was so embarrassed. I was ashamed because since I got married when I was young, I knew everyone was going to say “I told you so”.  I visualized people judging me and making up scenarios as to what could have ended our relationship.  But most of all, I judged myself for not being good enough to keep the relationship going. What could I have done differently and, why am I giving up?  I never give up! Giving up is for failures.  It took me several months of continuously beating myself up over this before I finally realized I was totally wrong. I didn’t fail when I chose to end my relationship, I simply went down a different path in life (one that, so far, has been pretty incredible).

 This overwhelming fear of failure has always been especially present in my creative process.  If I took a photo I wasn’t proud of I would work it to death and eventually just slap a texture over it and pretend that was my original vision.  A lot of really important photographs in my career were created that way, actually.  However, learning to get over my irrational fear of failure in my personal life has really helped me to overcome it in my photographic work as well. 


This photo was shot to go along with a new series I started (see this post) where I do self portraits based off song lyrics that I can relate to at the time or just love. Nothing about it was turning out the way I wanted it to in post processing… I tried so many different things and I couldn’t get it where I was happy.  I’m still not happy. This isn’t a photo I’d ever hang in a gallery or post with a sense of pride, but— did I fail in creating it? No. I learned what to do differently next time to get a better result.  Maybe it wasn’t what I originally hoped for, but the beauty of life & digital photography is that it’s not hard to try again.  I gave up editing this trying to fit it to a vision in my head that was simply not working, but by giving up doesn’t make me a failure. Instead, it shows that I’m passionate enough about my vision to make it look exactly like what’s in my head for everyone else to see— and I’m proud of that. 

Music has always been an important part of my life, but also my creative process. Here&#8217;s the beginning of a new series of self portraits that are inspired by lyrics that I can relate to, feel something for, etc."and suddenly a light appears inside my brain &amp; I think of my ways, I think of my days and know that I have changed. It&#8217;s the colors you have, no need to be sad. It really ain&#8217;t that bad.&#8221; &#8212; Grouplove.[note, though I intended on just using eye drops to give the streaks where tears used to be, I accidentally squirted ear ache drops into my eyes so&#8230; some of these tears are real. Don&#8217;t make that mistake with your own eyes&#8230; it buuurns.]

Music has always been an important part of my life, but also my creative process. Here’s the beginning of a new series of self portraits that are inspired by lyrics that I can relate to, feel something for, etc.

"and suddenly a light appears inside my brain & I think of my ways, I think of my days and know that I have changed. It’s the colors you have, no need to be sad. It really ain’t that bad.” — Grouplove.

[note, though I intended on just using eye drops to give the streaks where tears used to be, I accidentally squirted ear ache drops into my eyes so… some of these tears are real. Don’t make that mistake with your own eyes… it buuurns.]

Your Name Here

The editor at the alt-weekly I work for worked on this story for months and I’m so proud of the result of his hard work.  This is a well-balanced, investigative look into RAW artists… I highly recommend it!

undispvted asked: I just looked through some of your work and it's so so good. I really want to be a photographer when I grow up but people have been telling me it doesn't make good money. It's really what I love to do and what I want to have as my job. Any tips?

This is a good question! I think it can easily go both ways.  Talent is obviously important, but what I can attribute the success I’ve had (so far) to is working nonstop.  I am always diving into different projects and keep myself really busy with constantly perfecting what I do.  I talk about my work a lot on different social media platforms to promote myself as a brand & also my work.  I spend a ton of time reaching out to magazines, newspapers, advertising agencies, successful photographers I follow, managers & PR people for bands, etc. It’s difficult sometimes because with all the time I spend doing this, it limits my time for family/friends… having a balance is important but I’m still learning how to do that! Feel free to email me (info@jessefox.net) examples of your work and I’d be happy to help you! 
As far as money goes… still waiting on the big paycheck ha! I work at a newspaper full time which brings in a consistent income. The freelance work I do has been primarily for portfolio building and getting my name “out there” for the most part so far.

It’s almost 2014! This year has been a very interesting one for me both personally and professionally.  I have done a lot of traveling, grown up a lot, been published in 14 different publications and created some of my favorite images to date.  The photos here are a selection of a few of my favorites I shot for CityBeat, the publication I work for full-time in Cincinnati.  I am so grateful to have a job where I get paid to do what I love while still having time and being encouraged by my co-workers to continue doing freelance work and personal projects.  Not many people have the best of both worlds, so thank you CityBeat for allowing me to!  

A couple images from my editorial “Smoking in the Boys Room” for Sicky Magazine:

Photography – Jesse Fox

Styling – Kat Banas @thatskatastik

Models – Indiamara Deggerone & Jéssica Bronitzki @Muse Models NYC

Hair – Timothy Aylward

Make Up – Sean Mize

Styling Assistant – Virginia Ray

Clothes – Gypsy Warrior

lunafaery asked: I see posts on Facebook asking for models like 5'7" and taller. Any shoots coming up where you'd be willing to work with short girls?

Of course! Those calls are primarily for my fashion photoshoots. For most of my conceptual art I height + body type isn’t as important. Being a short gal myself, I like to be an equal opportunity photographer ha. We should shoot sometime :)

rlllylametbh asked: I absolutely love love love the photos you did with The Neighbourhood they are beautiful!

Thank you so much!! I’m happy to hear they are appreciated :)

Last Friday I had the awesome opportunity to photograph the California-based band, The Neighbourhood at Bogart’s in Cincinnati. After we did some promos (you can see these in my previous tumblr post here)  Jesse, their frontman, saw the graffiti wall and the opportunity to climb on something so we decided to shoot some images here playing with the relationship between his tattoos and the art on the building. Also, that adorable lil pup is Mr. Levi Snuggles Mackenzie, the most famous chihuahua in Cincinnati. :)

Last Friday I had the awesome opportunity to photograph the California-based band, The Neighbourhood at Bogart’s in Cincinnati. They were such cool guys and so much fun to work with. After shooting with them, I photographed their show (which was wonderful) and then hung out with a couple of them + the guys from the band Lovelife who they are on tour with.  It was a fun night & here are some of the images I came up with from the evening. Enjoy & check them out if you haven’t already!